Category Archives: Events

Clambake by the River: Nets of Seafood Net Support for Scholarships

clambakewrap  The evening of June 20 was ideal in every way: weather, location, company — and the perfect reason for a riverside celebration on the Connecticut River Academy patio, as more than 150 guests gathered to generously support scholarship opportunities at Goodwin College. From the moment they were greeted by the bountiful seafood bar of oysters, clams, and shrimp, the guests — most decked out in their summer blues and whites — knew that the Goodwin College Clambake would be something special.

Donors, faculty and staff members, local officials, and other friends of the College spent the beginning of the evening sampling the hors d’oeuvres and socializing with Goodwin students, some of whom had benefitted from past scholarship support. There was also a nautically themed Selfies Booth for those that wanted to dress up in costume and snap a photo or two.

At 7:30, the guests were called to dinner with catering by Flanders Fish Market and J Restaurant. Certainly one of the highlights of the evening was the red and white baskets stuffed with nets of steamed mussels, clams, potatoes, and corn, and topped with fresh, hearty lobsters. Experienced lobster lovers coached the newbies on the best ways to crack the shells and get every bit of meat.Collins

During dinner, President Mark Scheinberg addressed the crowd, thanking them for their support of Goodwin’s mission. In particular, he called attention to Dan and Betty Russell and Frank and Ceil Collins, whose recent generous leadership gifts to the scholarship fund will make a critical difference in the lives of a number of Goodwin students. This year’s student Commencement speaker, Jenette Davis, offered an abridged version of her speech and was warmly received by the guests.

Throughout the evening, the Cobalt Rhythm Kings kept the mood lively, inspiring a few brave partiers to take to the dance floor while others enjoyed their summer desserts. View photos of the festivities.

If you are interested in making your own gift to the scholarship fund, please contact the Goodwin College Foundation at (860) 291-9934.

Steve Forbes Speaks in Goodwin College ‘Vital Voices’ Lecture Series

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As part of Goodwin College’s Vital Voices lecture series, former presidential candidate and editor-in-chief of Forbes Magazine Steve Forbes told an interested audience that money was not as complicated as they might have thought.

Forbes came to Goodwin College on Thursday, June 12, as part of Vital Voices: The T. Boone Pickens Endowed Lectures Series in Education, Innovation and Entrepreneurship. This innovative speaker series focuses on first-hand perspectives of leaders who are making their mark in the business community and the world.  Forbes’s lecture was held in conjunction with the CT Forum and R.J. Julia Booksellers.

“It’s very special for us to have this particular guest gracing our stage,” Goodwin President Mark Scheinberg said. “You have here a gentleman willing to speak truth” to those in power, he continued.

Forbes shared insights from his new book Money: How the Destruction of the Dollar Threatens the Global Economy—and What We Can Do About it to an audience of over 180 people in Goodwin’s auditorium.  He said that though economic theory and monetary policy could be seen as boring topics, they were vitally important to the future of the country.

“Any students here who are on a bad date and you want out?” he joked, addressing the Goodwin College students in attendance. “Start talking about monetary policy and you’ll never see that person again.”

He told the audience that though the perception of money is that “only a handful of high priests at the Federal Reserve understand it,” the concept is much simple than is commonly thought.

“Money makes it easier to buy and sell between each other,” Forbes said. “That’s all it does.”

After a lecture on topics ranging from reverting to the gold standard, reforming the healthcare system, and simplifying the tax code, Forbes took questions from the audience. The question-and-answer session was moderated by WNPR Business Desk Editor Harriet Jones.

When asked by an audience member what advice he would give the new head of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, Forbes quipped: “Besides buy my book?”

His actual advice: “Get back to basics.”

With a circulation of more than 900,000, Forbes’ flagship publication, Forbes, is the nation’s leading business magazine. In 1996, Forbes entered the new media arena with the launch of Forbes.com. Now averaging 47 million unique monthly visitors, it has become a leading destination site for senior business decision-makers and investors.

Under Forbes’ leadership, the company has launched a variety of new publications and businesses, which include ForbesLife, the dedicated luxury lifestyle and culture magazine; Forbes Europe; Forbes Asia; and Forbes licensee editions published in over 30 countries.

In 1985, President Reagan named Forbes chairman of the bi-partisan Board for International Broadcasting, where he oversaw the operations of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. He was reappointed to his post by President George H. W. Bush and served until 1993.

Forbes serves on the boards of The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, The Heritage Foundation, and The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He is also on the Board of Overseers of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the Board of Visitors for the School of Public Policy of Pepperdine University.

By: Robert Muirhead

Goodwin Graduates Meet Eager Employers at Career Fair

As a part of its continuing effort to promote job growth and take students from the classroom to the workforce, Goodwin College Career Services organized an extensive all-program career fair in May. The fair was a response to requests from several local employers, according to Lee Hameroff, Director of Career Services.

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“We received a lot of good feedback from the employers who participated,” Hameroff said. “They were impressed by the people they spoke with and the level of quality of the individuals.”

With 16 different employers on hand, the career fair was intended to match motivated Goodwin candidates with eager employers. “This was a good opportunity” for both students and employers, Hameroff said.

The program was initially intended for students graduating between August 2013 and August 2014, as part of the 2014 Commencement activities. Due to the success of the event, and continuing demand from students and employers, the plan is now for the career fair to become an annual event.

Companies and organizations taking part in this year’s fair included: AFLAC, American Eagle Federal Credit Union,

A2Z Global Staffing, Change Incorporated, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Community Health Resources, CW Resources Inc., Community Health Center Association of CT, Farm Tek, Hartford Public Schools, Human Resource Association of New Britain, Maxim Staffing Solutions, Mary Kay Cosmetics, StayWell Health Center, USA Security Services, and YMCA of Hartford.

 

Goodwin College to Present Steve Forbes in Vital Voices: The T. Boone Pickens Endowed Lecture Series in Education, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

On Thursday, June 12, Goodwin College welcomes Steve Forbes, former presidential candidate and editor-in-chief of Forbes Magazine, to Vital Voices: The T. Boone Pickens Endowed Lecture Series in Education, Innovation and Entrepreneurship.This innovative speaker series focuses on first-hand perspectives of leaders who are making their mark in the business community and the world.

The event, hosted by Goodwin College in partnership with the Connecticut Forum and RJ Julia Booksellers, begins at 6:30 p.m. in the College’s auditorium. Forbes will share insights from his new book Money: How the Destruction of the Dollar Threatens the Global Economy — and What We Can Do About It.

Tickets for the event are $25 per person and include a copy of Forbes’ new book, a wine and cheese reception, and book signing following the talk.

To purchase tickets, please call 860-509-0909 or visit the Connecticut Forum’s website at: http://www.ctforum.org/special-events/steve-forbes.

With a circulation of more than 900,000, Forbes’ flagship publication, Forbes, is the nation’s leading business magazine. In 1996, Forbes entered the new media arena with the launch of Forbes.com. Now averaging 47 million unique monthly visitors, it has become a leading destination site for senior business decision-makers and investors.

Under Forbes’ leadership, the company has launched a variety of new publications and businesses, which include ForbesLife, the dedicated luxury lifestyle and culture magazine; Forbes Europe; Forbes Asia; and Forbes licensee editions published in over 30 countries.

In 1985, President Reagan named Forbes chairman of the bi-partisan Board for International Broadcasting, where he oversaw the operations of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. He was reappointed to his post by President George H. W. Bush and served until 1993.

Forbes serves on the boards of The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, The Heritage Foundation, and The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He is also on the Board of Overseers of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the Board of Visitors for the School of Public Policy of Pepperdine University.

The event will take place at Goodwin College, One Riverside Drive, East Hartford, CT 06118.

By: Hannah Stacy

Goodwin Women Celebrate Real Women, Real Life

On Saturday, April 26, a heartwarming gathering of mothers, daughters, sisters, colleagues, and friends came together at the Pond House Café in West Hartford for Real Women, Real Life, a brunch event to benefit Goodwin College scholarships for women.

Women's Brunch 025Proud of the women that account for 82% of its current student population, Goodwin values the dreams of students and acknowledges their struggles. A wonderful spirit of camaraderie and excitement was in the air at the event, noted Brooke Penders, Vice President of Advancement at the College.

“Today we are here to appreciate real women dealing with real life. We are here to celebrate all of the women who make it possible — those who challenge us, support us, and love us,” Penders stated.

New Image3Penders introduced Amy Tenenbaum, a 22-year-old nursing student, who faced considerable challenges on her journey to Goodwin and is a great example of what women deal with in real life. For many years, Tenenbaum struggled with an intense eating disorder that affected every aspect of her life. Finally realizing it was time for a change, she entered rehab and found the strength to overcome her problem. “The nurses and doctors truly inspired me,” she shared with the guests at the brunch. “I started looking into nursing as a career and was instantly attracted to the supportive environment at Goodwin. I’m constantly surrounded by intelligent, inspirational women.”

Teshia Levy-Grant, Assistant Professor of First Year Experience, who took the podium next began with a quotation from Ralph Waldo Emerson: “The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” Emerson’s insight resonated with Levy-Grant on many levels. Having lost both her son and her brother, she found strength in other women. Many of Levy-Grant’s students are immersed in similar difficult situations, but she does everything in her power to prevent them from failing. “My purpose is to believe in students when they can’t believe in themselves… to reach out and invest in them.”

New ImageDr. Maria Ellis (pictured second from left), physician at Woodland Women’s Health Associates and chair of the Goodwin College Board of Trustees, invests in Goodwin in more ways than one. It is evident in the way she speaks of the College that she believes strongly in its mission and cares deeply for the students. Ellis thanked her mother, Esther, who worked long hours to see her through college and medical school. “My mom went back to school as an adult learner to pursue a master’s degree in education. I’ve met so many people at Goodwin like my mother. She made education available to me. She is the reason I made it through school.”

The brunch concluded with feelings of gratitude and empowerment. “Too often we see women bringing each other down. Today we are celebrating women and building each other up. It is amazing what we can accomplish when we support each other,” Penders stated.

Goodwin College sincerely thanks everyone who came to support the resilient, strong women who help define the College’s mission. The event was a great success due in large part to the immense support of donors and friends of the College. Goodwin hopes to continue to facilitate a supportive, positive environment for real women in real life.

Check out the photo album here!

By: Hannah Stacy

CT Sun Holds Open Practice at Goodwin

Over 200 excited Connecticut Sun fans packed the gymnasium of the Connecticut River Academy at Goodwin College on Tuesday, May 6, to see the state’s only major professional sports team CT Sun 125practice, meet the public, and celebrate the beginning of the new season.

Academy students hosted the open practice at their school, relishing the chance to watch professionals play on their home court.

“Man, I love it,” student Trequell Roberts said. “I asked them, ‘When can I get my one-on-one?’”

The team’s response?  “‘Maybe in a week, when you’re ready,’” Roberts said.

Team members handing out prizes to the crowd of fans.

Team members handing out prizes to the crowd of fans.

Roberts is just one of the students participating in CTRA’s inaugural Amateur Athletic Union basketball league, which Principal Linda Dadona said is helping to connect students who come to the Academy from 42 different Connecticut towns to the local Goodwin community.

“I think it’s an honor for them to host the Sun,” Dadona said of her students. “They’re pretty excited.”

The CT Sun has a longstanding relationship with Goodwin College, according to Todd Andrews, Goodwin’s Vice President of Economic & Strategic Development.  In 2012, the CT Sun Foundation made a $20,000 contribution to the school for the creation of a scholarship to support adult students returning to school to complete degrees.

Goodwin College  and Connecticut Sun mascots, Ebb and Blaze with CT Sun fan, Ivy Caudill

Goodwin College and Connecticut Sun mascots, Ebb and Blaze with CT Sun fan, Ivy Caudill

“They were aware we opened a new facility,” Andrews said of the Sun’s decision to practice at the Academy. “And they have a lot of fans in this area.

Connecting with local fans is why the team holds open practices, Head Coach Anne Donovan said.

“It really lets the girls connect with old fans and new fans,” Donovan said. “And lets them see why the Connecticut Sun is special.”

As the team signed autographs for eager fans old and young, Donovan beamed.

After practice, fans stood in line for autographs.

After practice, fans stood in line for autographs.

“They’re great role models,” she said. “They’re great people.”

The Sun begins their 12th season at Mohegan Sun Arena on May 16th against the New York Liberty at 7 p.m. Season tickets and mini plans are on sale now, and can be purchased by calling a Sun Ticket Representative at 1.877.SUN.TIXX (786-8499) or via email at tickets@connecticutsun.com. To purchase season tickets online, visit http://bit.ly/sunseason14. Mini plans can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/miniplans14.

Click here to see our photo album on Flickr!

By: Robert Muirhead

Goodwin Students Attend Law Enforcement Panel

On Monday, April 7, Goodwin College’s Career Services team accompanied several students to the Second Annual Federal Law Enforcement Career Panel and Networking Event in New Haven. The program began with a panel featuring United States Attorney for Connecticut Deirdre Daly and several agency heads. Following the discussion, students from Connecticut colleges were able to network with agencies including the FBI, DEA, and Secret Service.

Goodwin Public Safety student Sarah Harper appreciated being able to ask professionals for advice. “After talking to the agents, I learned that in this field, you need real-world experience, which reinforces Goodwin’s philosophy. Goodwin employs professors who work or have worked in the field and can share their knowledge with us. They also assist students in finding internships to build their resumes.”

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Manny Sanchez, Employee Relations Coordinator for Goodwin, spoke about the importance of networking. “The students valued hearing from the agents who spoke about their individual journeys and the steps they took to be where they are today. They had the opportunity participate in discussions that truly gave them a unique experience.”

Alex Stagnaro, Criminal Justice student, gained insight into the many careers offered in his planned field. As a first generation student, Stagnaro takes advantage of the tools Goodwin provides him with so he can secure a stable job in the future. “I came away with a better idea of what I want to do. I learned it’s not always about catching the bad guy; it’s about standing up for those who were wronged.”New Image

Lee Hameroff, Director of Career Services, hopes that the students benefited from meeting with these real professionals, who provided stories about their challenges and successes. “Events like these serve as a motivator. This one, in particular, was important for students because it incorporated opportunities to develop the necessary soft skills that employers are looking for, such as communication and confidence.”

By: Hannah Stacy

Goodwin College: Bridging the Gap between High School and College

High school guidance counselors from around the state gathered in Goodwin College’s Community Room for a spring-themed, informative session and breakfast on March 28. Goodwin employees and a panel of students led an engaging discussion on the benefits of attending Goodwin College. “Students come to Goodwin for a better life and a positive change,” Nick Lentino, Assistant Vice President for Enrollment, explained. “We are here to serve them.”

Students who have just graduated from high school may feel a little lost in their new setting, but Goodwin is here to support all students in this unfamiliar process. “We understand that it’s challenging for students, especially when they don’t have family support, but we want to take care of them and guide them,” Lentino stated.

Goodwin student Kaleigh Miller is the first person in her extended family to attend college. “I didn’t have the best grades in high school, and my parents weren’t supportive of my going to college, but Goodwin is my second chance. I started a new life here,” Miller said.

Admissions

Goodwin’s Summer Bridge Program, a free program designed to bridge the gap between high school and college, puts students on the path to success in college and beyond.

“Some students aren’t engaged after they graduate from high school. This is an opportunity to make sure they are checked in and motivated to attend college in the fall,” said Aaron Isaacs, Director of Educational Opportunity Programs.

“Students just need to come with drive, motivation, and the willingness to succeed.  All else is covered at no cost. The benefits for 18 to 20 year olds are tremendous at Goodwin,” said Angela Skyers, Assistant Dean of Students.

After attending Summer Bridge, students are eligible for the MOVE (Men of Vision and Education) and WISE (Women Invested in Securing an Education) programs. If accepted into these programs, they will receive scholarships that cover 75% of their tuition at Goodwin plus free books each semester.

The programs come with myriad support systems and one-on-one guidance. “MOVE and WISE are meant to be engaging and supportive. We meet with students weekly and have team meetings where students get to hear from speakers on a variety of topics,” Isaacs stated.

In order to stay in the program, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.7, engage in 15 hours of community service per semester, and be active with one of the clubs on campus. “We have completed almost 2,000 hours of community service through MOVE and WISE and are eligible for a Connecticut Community Service Award,” Isaacs noted.

Kyle Thompson, a member of the MOVE program, emphasized that he is not just a student for school, but a student for life. “I wasn’t motivated in high school. I didn’t think college was for me, but I enrolled in the MOVE program and gave it one more shot. Goodwin taught me not to give up and not to sit still. I’ve learned to make choices that will be a ‘good win’,” Thompson said.

Lester Castro, business student and veteran, described Goodwin as a family. “They call me by my first name. Big schools can be overwhelming. Expenses and partying can get in the way. There are so many opportunities here and I can always find the help I need,” Castro stated.

Goodwin hopes to expand on the educational programs offered to add more layers to the fabric of the school. The College committed over $7 million in support for students to start or stay in school last year.

For more information on the Summer Bridge Program, click here. For more information on the MOVE and WISE programs, click here. For questions on enrollment, please contact Sue Hogan, Academic Community Liaison, at 727-6739 or SHogan@goodwin.edu.

By: Hannah Stacy

Dinner Etiquette and The Performing Arts

On March 20, students in Goodwin College’s Women Invested in Securing an Education (WISE) and Men of Vision in Education (MOVE) programs participated in a formal dining and theatre experience guided by Goodwin’s Vice President of Advancement, Brooke Penders, and Pratt and Whitney’s Community Relations Director, Heather Summerer. With the help of the facilities team and catering by the Spicy Green Bean, staff members transformed the College’s community room into an exquisite setting for practicing business and dinner etiquette.

Students were greeted at the door by the speakers and evaluated on their handshake, eye contact, and introductions. Throughout the dinner, they were guided by tips on appropriate table manners, the function of the place setting, and how to carry on a conversation while eating. The goal was to make sure that students are comfortable in unfamiliar social situations. At the conclusion of dinner, students had a quick tutorial on theater etiquette and were treated to a performance of the national tour of The Book of Mormon at The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts. The experience provided a unique opportunity for the staff to expose students to different cultural venues.

New Image Our goal was to provide students with a chance to practice conversational skills and recognize connecting points when networking.  We found it important to make their first performing arts experience fun and entertaining. The whole evening proved memorable for the students and plans are already in motion to attend future performances.

 

We acknowledge and thank our grant funders, the Harford Foundation for Public Giving, the Aurora Women and Girls Foundation, and the Beatrice Fox Auerbach Foundation Fund at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, for making this event possible.

Background

Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) students prior to the start of the fall semester were given an academic behavioral assessment called Engage©. The intent of the assessment is to look at the psychosocial factors that contribute to success in college. The results are the grouped into three major themes: Motivation and Skill, Social Connectivity, and Self-Regulation and Persistence. During the spring 2014 semester, our focus is on Motivation and Skill. Throughout students’ academic journeys, they will have a multitude of opportunities to enhance their reading, writing, and career skills through the classroom. While this is extremely critical to student academic success, students also need opportunities for experiential learning to enhance their “soft skills” in order to remain competitive in meeting the demands of a highly diverse and skilled work force. Employers no longer base their hiring decisions on immaculate resumes and cover letters; they seek articulate, well-rounded individuals who can represent their companies. Soft skills like travel, dinner etiquette, engaging in meaningful conversation, and access to the performing arts can give students an edge in securing a career.

This entry was written by guest blogger Aaron Isaacs, Goodwin College’s Director of Educational Opportunity Programs.

Vital Voices in Entrepreneurship Featuring Stew Leonard, Jr.: The Ups and Downs of Running A Successful Family Business

An audience of more than 300 gathered at Goodwin College on February 26 to hear Stew Leonard Jr., president and CEO of Stew Leonard’s, deliver an inspiring, uplifting speech, often laced with humor, at Vital Voices in Entrepreneurship, a speaker series focused on first-hand perspectives from leaders who are making their mark in business and the community.

Leonard pictured with Scheinberg and two Goodwin students,  Marlon Jengelly and John Fountain.

Leonard pictured with Scheinberg and two Goodwin students, Marlon Jengelly and John Fountain.

President Mark Scheinberg set the tone for the evening as he addressed the packed auditorium buzzing with energy. “Goodwin College is anything but institutional. We are deeply customer based,” he said, making Leonard a perfect guest speaker. “What’s amazing about his stores is that you don’t feel like a customer. It’s an event. It’s an experience that’s really, really special.”

“This crowd is a testament to our guest. We are very blessed and very appreciative to have him here.” He welcomed Leonard to the podium, referring to him as a “true icon of Connecticut business.”

Stew Leonard’s, a unique family owned and operated fresh farm food store, came from humble beginnings in the 1960s, as a milk company — one with a distinctive flair for marketing. During the last 50 years, the company has expanded its products with four farm store locations in Connecticut and New York, as well as nine wine stores in the tri-state area, accounting for more than 20 million visitors annually.

Leonard referenced the four main STEW principles of business that he and his family follow: Satisfy, Teamwork, Excellence, and Wow!

Satisfying customers and maintaining the philosophy that the customer is always right have proved essential to Stew Leonard’s business plan. Listening to customer needs and providing for them are something the Leonard family insists on. “People want to help local farms, they want organic foods, and they don’t want antibiotics in their food. We get a lot of our products from farmers in Connecticut, and we provide whole, organic foods that customers want,” Leonard noted.

The dictionary defines teamwork as a “cooperative effort on the part of a group of persons acting together in the interest of a common cause.” Leonard understands the importance of a healthy working environment. “You can’t make a great place to shop without first making it a great place to work,” he stated.

The number of Stew Leonard’s employees is growing at a steady pace with no layoffs in the history of the business. Achievement awards are presented at events to show appreciation for all of their hard work in the common cause of providing quality products. Employees are the key to making a business prosperous. Something is certainly working: Stew Leonard’s has been included in FORTUNE Magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list for the last 10 consecutive years.

“Stew’s business messages are wrapped in honesty and humor. They are simple, clear, and very affective. He understands that his employees make his business what it is,” said Lee Housley, a current student in Goodwin’s Management and Leadership program.

Leonard’s third philosophy, excellence, means providing top-notch products and staying up to date with the latest trends. Leonard explained, “We make our bread fresh in store, we meet with ranchers to find the best quality meat, we get our lobsters from Maine, we provide fresh fruit platters, and we are always in search of new products.”

When “cronuts” (a cross between a croissant and a donut) became a recent fad, Stew Leonard’s developed their own version, selling over $100,000 worth since August. Another treat, “crogels” (a cross between a croissant and a bagel) have created profits upwards of $50,000 in a just a few weeks of their premiere.

Researching, being ahead of the curve, and visiting with farmers to understand where their products are coming from have allowed the company to reap endless benefits. “With competitors like Walmart, Costco’s, Whole Foods, and Trader Joe’s, we can’t just sit back. We are always trying to make the stores better,” Leonard said.

The final philosophy — the Wow! Factor — is all about creating a unique, uplifting experience. “We don’t act like a chain. We keep that family feeling alive,” Leonard stated. Stew Leonard’s provides an interactive environment complete with costumed characters for kids, milk containers that sing, and much more. No one who visits a Stew Leonard’s location is likely to forget the experience.

As with all businesses, Stew Leonard’s has experienced its share of failure. “The reality of life is that there are bumps and setbacks and you stumble,” Leonard explained, “but you pick yourself back up.” Failure is a part of business and life in general. “[Leonard] embraces the failures as opportunities to be better,” Housley noted.

Some of Leonard’s setbacks have been personal. He lost his 21-month-old toddler in a drowning accident in 1989. This sparked Leonard and his wife to seek ways to prevent this tragedy from striking other families, especially since drowning is the leading cause of accidental death in children under five. In 1990, the Stew Leonard III Water Safety Foundation was founded. In 2006, the Leonards expanded the foundation’s mission to address childhood obesity through better nutrition. To learn more about the Stew Leonard III Water Safety Foundation, visit their site: http://www.stewietheduck.com/12ourstory.cfm

“Triumph through tragedy” seems fitting for Stew Leonard and his success story. In business and in life there are hurdles to overcome, but once crossed they can lead to endless possibilities through effort and hard work.

Goodwin thanks the East Hartford Chamber of Commerce for sponsoring the event. In addition, Scheinberg made an announcement that T. Boone Pickens, Texas businessman, philanthropist, and Goodwin College 2013 Honorary Doctorate recipient, will be providing funding for future speaker series at the College called the T.Boone Pickens Endowed Speaker Series – Vital Voices in Education, Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

By: Hannah Stacy